Tag Archives: Rafa Benitez

Best Week in Ages

The week started with the first round of the County Senior Fours knock-out competition – well over 250 years of age in aggregate on our side anyway, though we all like to think (with some justification) that the game keeps us young.

Opponents Hexham House drew ahead in the early ends, with the emphasis on “drew” as they genuinely found their length better than we did. But they never got more than four ahead, and with almost all ends being singles the score was just 6-9 after 12 ends. At this point we scored a three by removing their shot bowl and were all square. They won the next end, but we levelled to 10-10 after 15 ends; they got another single and again we levelled to 11-11 after 17 ends. At least this significantly reduced the chances of an extra end! We then held the shot from the first bowl of the last end, but it was a vulnerable side bowl, and skip Richard Blaylock narrowly failed to take it out with his first bowl before pushing one of ours in with his second so that we scored a two for a 13-11 win. This was the only time in the match that we had been in front – the best time to do it! No doubt Hexham House thought they were hard done by, but overall, with nine ends apiece and 13 ends resulting in only a single shot, we would have felt the same if we had lost – it couldn’t have been closer.

The return of our thirty-somethings for the Nines match at Heaton Victoria the following night considerably reduced the average age of the team, but here too the result could hardly have been closer. The pairs started very well in the pairs, going 8-2 ahead after six ends, but after another six they had been pegged back to 9-9. From there they did get to 10-10 but then lost the last five ends to finish 10-17 down. The fours also got a good start, 6-0 after three ends, but they too were pegged back: after the lead changed hands a couple of times they were level with two ends to play before losing a shot to a fluke (it could have been worse, as the fluke initially left Heaton lying three!). But for the second night running Brian Norman got a pressure bowl in on the last end and we actually scored four for a 17-14 win.

This of course left the match in the balance, with the triples 15-13 ahead but with two ends still to play. Two shots on a very tight end gave us a four-shot lead going into the last, and although the Heaton skip rattled the head and moved the jack with his final bowl it was not enough to change the outcome. In blog posts in previous years we have had cause to comment on the closeness of games between Heaton Victoria and ourselves, and this was no exception – one of those where our 6-2 win could so easily have been 2-6, or even 0-8.

We then had to come to terms with a different scoring system for the Clegg league game on Wednesday. Here there are four rinks of two-bowl triples, with two points per rink and a large six-point bonus for the team winning on shots: 14 points in all. The visitors were Gosforth Central, and this time there was nothing close about the match at all, except for one rink which.we lost by one shot. The others more than made up for this, with a spectacular 34-3 win for Darren’s rink, and a total shots score of 98-43. Apparently we were in the Clegg league many years ago, but our re-entry in the bottom division represents a first experience for most people. The two-bowl format takes a little getting used to, and the importance of getting early bowls in the head is amplified. We shall certainly need a few more games before we can form a proper view of how well we are coping.

Chirton were the visitors for the ladies’ first home game of the season in the Collins and Shipley league, still in the format of three rinks of four despite various attempts by league clubs to reduce it to triples. Again just one rink won, and not by enough to make a difference on shots, so it was another 2-10 defeat. We just hope the season will echo Newcastle’s football progress – after a really poor, winless start they developed some confidence and picked up enough points to beat the drop with something to spare. Who’s going to play the part of Rafa Benítez here?

Certainly Rafa would have been pleased with our defensive organisation in the West Tyne game against Prudhoe Castle on Thursday. It wasn’t a runaway victory – certainly not compared to the massive 118-41 racked up by Haltwhistle on the same night – but we kept things tight on all rinks and limited Prudhoe to 48 shots in all. Our total of 72 was very respectable, but as in previous years it was the ability to keep the opposition scores low which made all the difference. On both Trevor and Malcolm’s rinks Prudhoe won eight ends but only nine shots, while our own sides scored 16 and 26 respectively. The other two rinks finished 16-14, one for each club, and even if it was vaguely disappointing to see us lose that one rink you simply had to feel pleased for the Prudhoe skip, proud to be still playing at the age of 94. As he should be. And to think that the senior fours thought they were doing ok for their age…

 

Postscript:  It was interesting that within days of our description of a super-senior player, The Times carried an obituary of Gerry Ells, over-85 tennis world champion in singles and doubles, and – while in his nineties – still playing two hours of tennis daily and cycling on his own.  His widely used nickname was “the Freak”, and while no one would wish to use this word, however affectionately, for our friend from Prudhoe, the performance is still very noteworthy.

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Turning the Tables

After a mere two-day gap between the two previous posts, it’s been almost two weeks since the last one – fancy real life getting in the way of bowls, eh?  Rafa Benítez has apparently described football as “the most important of the least important things in life” – maybe he hasn’t heard of bowls…

Last week’s West Tyne league fixture survived the weather, although there had been fears of a postponement for a while with really heavy showers late afternoon.  Two of our players played the entire game with full waterproofs on, although in reality it didn’t rain once the match had started and after a few ends it wasn’t even necessary to dry the woods. However, with the moisture in the air the appearance of the Allendale midgies was even more predictable than normal!

Steve had a fairly comfortable win, leading throughout and finishing 18-12 up. David Boaden relied on a late charge, winning 27-15 after leading just 9-8 after eight ends. Richard Hart-Jackson’s rink came back from 4-10 down to 10-all, then led 12-10 but lost 7 shots on the final 3 ends to go down 12-17. The sub-plot here was that they were lying six shots on the 17th end until the Allen Valley skip moved the jack and scored three.

The fourth rink was even closer at the end, after being tight all the way, with seldom more than a couple of shots in it.  Elvaston led 11-10 with two ends to go. On the last-but-one Allen Valley skip George Little took the shot wood out with his last bowl to claim a three and go 13-11 up. On the final end, Allen Valley were lying shot but had no back woods. David Ashworth moved the jack back with his second wood and George’s final wood stopped short. So we got a three in return to steal it 14-13 with no need for the final bowl. The overall result was therefore a 6-1 win (71-57 on shots).

This week’s Cup semi-final at Haltwhistle went less well.  Cup matches are decided on rinks won, not shots, and our line-ups were strong enough to give us hope of nicking at least two rinks.  However, Malcolm’s rink were behind for most of the match, losing by eight shots; Trevor’s rink started well but failed to recover from a dropped five, losing 12-17; and Darren also lost a count towards the end, losing 13-16.   Three single-digit defeats tell a consistent story, and we have to admit that Haltwhistle were just too accurate for us when it mattered.  As ever, it was a fixture which was both competitive and friendly – and at least the rain held off until we were in having a cup of tea.

This week we heard that Hirst Park have dropped out of the Nines league, thus reducing the original eight teams to just six.  Hirst Park were on our list of re-arranged fixtures, so that reduces the congestion but it is still a disappointment – and even more of a disappointment for those clubs who have already played Hirst Park, and now lose any points earned.  At least we had no points to start with, not having played them, but of course we were still bottom of the table going into our game with table-toppers Backworth.

It’s possible that Backworth were just a bit complacent  – who knows? – but for whatever reason all our rinks started well.  The pairs were soon 10-2 up, and the triples picked up a seven – almost unheard of, even against lesser teams – so that with everything going right for the fours we were leading on all three rinks after 14 ends.  From here on things became quite tense – though not for the fours, who took full advantage of what even they admitted were a couple of lucky breaks to build up a nine-shot lead with two ends to go, then added another two to hold an unbeatable lead going into the last end, achieving a final score of 19-9 .

The pairs had inched ahead in a low-scoring match, increasing their lead from one, to two, to four shots by the fifteenth end before losing a four that made the score 12-12 with two to go; but they then won both of those ends to make it 15-12 and seal the overall match result.  The triples were also pegged back to equality (16-16) with four ends to play, before each side scored two to reach 18-18 and then a single shot each for a 19-19 draw. So overall it was a 7-1 win, a result that would have fetched long odds at the bookies’, but which confirmed our earlier contention that form and teamwork have improved a lot over recent weeks.  We’ll still be bottom of the table, for sure, but not by very much, and now with some momentum to take us into a busy period of re-arranged matches.

The day after this upset, Alnwick were the visitors in a Collins and Shipley league game.  Here too our ladies were bottom of the league while Alnwick were top – by only one point, and maybe thanks to a lot of home games, but top none the less. So here was another challenge.

Rather like the men in the Nines, the ladies seemed to be encouraged, rather than put off, by the quality of the opposition.  After about ten ends, one of our rinks was 5-10 down and another was losing by three, with the third rink ahead by seven.  From that point on the various scores changed quite a bit, but the overall closeness hardly changed until the last end. Blanche’s rink were reeled in but still won by two shots, while our second rink came back to be close to a draw until our final bowl gave the shot to Alnwick, who declined to bowl their last one and took a one-shot win.  With Elvaston therefore winning by one shot on the two completed games, all eyes turned to Betty’s rink.  Having already come from 5-10 down to move to 15-10 ahead, they would clinch the match by avoiding a six on the last end – but when the Alnwick third trailed the jack to give them a very solid four, with two bowls still to come, things started to look ominous.  Betty’s first bowl was caught up in the traffic, but her second was perfectly judged, hitting her first full-on and promoting it not just to save a count but actually to get the shot.  To win this match 10-2 on league points was a major achievement – and there would certainly be no point in trying to persuade the ladies that this was one of the “least important things in life”…